ePoly Briefs

 

 

a monthly publication of news and events for faculty and staff

 

                                                                                            September 2003 Edition

ARCHIVES

HEADLINES
Poly Named One of the Best Northeastern Colleges
Enrollment, Revenue and TIAA-CREF Discussed at Town Hall Meeting
Gerald M. Rubin, Decoder of the Fruit Fly Genome, To Speak at Polytechnic
Poly Honors Seven at Awards Ceremony September 30
Meet Sonia Moin, Student Council's Interim President
Happy Birthday, Ernst Weber!
Regna Lounge Is Dedicated October 7
University Hosts National Student Conference
Over-the-counter Medications Now Covered in Poly’s Flex Spending Account
The Poly Health Center Is Here for You
New Hires and Promotions
Awards and Honors
Publications and Presentations
This Month in History

 

POLY NAMED ONE OF THE BEST NORTHEASTERN COLLEGES

Polytechnic University was featured in the inaugural edition of The Best Northeastern Colleges, published by the Princeton Review in August 2003.

The book showcases the top 135 institutions in eight states: New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine.

“Each college had to meet two criteria,” says Robert Franek, the lead author of the guide. “First it had to meet our criteria for academic excellence within its region. Second, we had to be able to survey its students anonymously.”

Among the survey’s findings, Polytechnic was noted for its small classes, interaction among a diverse student body and great computer facilities.

Back to headlines

 

ENROLLMENT, REVENUE AND TIAA-CREF DISCUSSED AT TOWN HALL MEETING

A the September 23 Town Hall meeting with President Chang and the Administrative Council, issues related to enrollment, revenue and development were raised.

Discussing enrollment, Chang said that although Poly had a “pretty high meld down” with approximately 479 students enrolling from the 525 who put down a deposit, “new students are not our problem. We are only off by eight students from last year.” The problem, he said, is a large attrition rate in returning students, which resulted in Poly losing 330 students this year. The main reasons students don’t return, he noted, were financial followed by a decline in the computer science field. Poly’s computer science discipline experienced a 30 percent decrease in enrollment and computer engineering had a 10 percent decrease. Although other disciplines have seen growth in enrollment—including mechanical engineering with a 40 percent growth and civil engineering with a 20 percent growth—the low undergraduate enrollment resulted in a $1 million loss in revenue for the University.

“We’ve had some gains” with graduate enrollment, said Chang, explaining that full-time graduate grew by 20 students, and the Westchester and Long Island graduate centers were level with last year’s numbers. “But we’ve also been hurt,” he added. New part-time graduate enrollment is down 30 percent in Brooklyn and enrollment is “way down” for the executive degree programs, especially the Information Systems Engineering Program and Telecommunications and Information Management Program.

Low graduate enrollment translates into approximately $1.5 million in lost revenue. Together, Poly has an enrollment revenue shortfall of $2.5 million.

The next step affects staff and faculty. At the end of September, Chang and his vice presidents will bring recommendations to the Finance Committee of the Board of Trustees. The full board will convene October 7 to decide upon the recommendations. These recommendations include freezing employee positions and reducing TIAA-CREF contributions. Chang stressed that there will be no “across-the-board layoffs.” He will outline the board’s decisions in his next letter to faculty and staff.

Dean and VP Bud Griffis spoke next. He praised the “great staff and faculty” and the success of the recent open houses and convocation and “great performances" by Financial Aid, Information Systems for installing software on students’ computers and the math and humanities departments for administrating pre-college exams. He told the audience to “wait and see. This flower’s got to blossom.” He also said the administration will be making decisions on Poly’s pricing structure as well as its financial packages.

Following Griffis was VP Ellen Hartigan, who said that her division’s target this year was to “close the loop” on a number of issues that are still cropping up. “We have different students, but the same problems,” she said. “We need to solve the problems.” She also commented on recent student events, including convocation, new student orientation, Club Day and Sports Day, and called it the “best beginning of a school year in my 15 years” and commended Cheryl McNear, Robert Griffin and Eunice Ro for their work. She also announced the return of ROTC to campus, in affiliation with Fordham, and a one-percent improvement this year of alumni giving.

VP Richard Thorsen spoke next. He said the search for a VP for finance and administration is “still going strong,” and the search committee plans to recommend three candidates to the president in early October. He announced that the next capital campaign is in the planning stages and will go public in 15 to 18 months. The University will soon hire a consulting firm to look at the fiscal feasibilities of the next campaign. He also touched upon Campaign 1-2-3 and its role to move Polytechnic into tier 2 in the next two years. Asked to comment about the University’s role in helping students during the August blackout, he said that approximately 100 to 150 people, including himself, students, staff and faculty members, stayed overnight in the Dibner Auditorium. “You haven’t bonded with your colleagues until you can identify them by their snoring,” he said, to much laughter.

VP Lowell Robinson, in response to a question from a faculty member, said the University is researching the feasibility of an online learning program. A task force has been formed, which is currently examining online program models and will develop a marketing plan. A donor has given Poly $200,000 to help launch the initiative.

Back to headlines

 

GERALD M. RUBIN, DECODER OF THE FRUIT FLY GENOME, TO SPEAK AT POLYTECHNIC

Gerald M. Rubin, internationally recognized geneticist and vice president for biomedical research at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, will speak at Polytechnic on his pioneering work sequencing the fruit fly genome. The event, the Sixth Annual Lynford Lecture, is at 4 p.m. on Monday, October 20, in the Dibner Auditorium.

Rubin will discuss “Computational and Experimental Approaches for Annotating the Drosophila Genome Sequence.” From 1991 to 2000, he led a team of academic scientists, in collaboration with Celera Genomics Inc., to sequence the genes of the common fruit fly, or Drosophila melanogaster. The success of the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project has paved the way for scientists to more fully understand human genes and development.

To learn more about Rubin’s work, click on the following links:

A 1999 interview with Rubin in ScienceWatch

HHMI article announcing the completion of the Drosophila genome sequence

Written testimony by Rubin presented in 2000 to the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment of the Congressional Committee on Science

Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project Website

Back to headlines

 

POLY HONORS SEVEN AT AWARDS CEREMONY SEPTEMBER 30

For their contributions toward making Polytechnic a better place to work, teach and learn, seven employees will receive an Extra Step Award at a special ceremony at 3 p.m., on Tuesday, September 30, in LC 400. In addition, the Extra Mile Award will be awarded.

Please come out on September 30, and cheer the following award recipients:

Maureen Braziel, director of athletics, intramurals and recreation, won in the category of pride and enthusiasm for her “can-do attitude in developing a spirited and enthusiastic athletics program,” wrote a nominator. “Maureen set forth an aggressive recruitment program aimed at attracting the right students and coaches necessary to build a quality Division III intercollegiate athletics program.” Brooklyn born, raised and current resident, Braziel joined Polytechnic in 1982 as a physical education instructor and established the Judo and women’s volleyball teams. She was promoted to associate director of athletics in 1987 and to her current title in 1997. A graduate of Hunter College with two degrees in physical education administration and exercise physiology, she became, in 1971, the first foreigner to win the British Open Judo Championship, the largest international Judo competition for women. She was the national Judo champion for four consecutive years in the mid 1970s.

Yolanda Cartagena, administrative aide in Registrar, won in the category of leadership and teamwork for her, in the words of a nominator, “consistent, persistent and reliable efforts to help correct [problems with PeopleSoft data]. As a result, the student data is slowly but surely becoming more accurate and reliable. By her efforts…she is decreasing student frustration with Poly.” Cartagena began her career at Poly in 1988 as a clerical temp in Student Accounts before being hired full time in 1989. Seven years later, she moved to Registrar, where she processes grades, audits graduate degrees and helps with registration. A native New Yorker, she lives in Manhattan and is currently enrolled in the BS program in Psychology at City College.

Patrick Eng , administrative aide/bookkeeper in Development, won in the category of reliability and integrity and is the first work-study student to win an Extra Step Award. He was cited for his work in Alumni Relations and Development, beginning as a freshman for the Phonathon program and continuing as a clerk for the next four years. “Patrick was an extremely reliable worker who took great pride in everything he did,” wrote a nominator. “When he is given a task, you can rest easy knowing that it will be done and done correctly with much attention paid to detail.” Eng graduated this year with dual bachelor’s degrees in electrical engineering and computer engineering and now works full time at Poly while continuing his education as a master’s candidate in management.

Greys Jessurum , who joined Facilities Management in May as an administrative assistant, received the award in the category of customer service for her work as a secretary in Financial Aid. “Greys has gone the extra step in helping incoming freshmen and their families [with their financial aid packages],” wrote a nominator. “She takes a personal approach to everyone she deals with.” Several families wrote letters praising her efforts, including one who wrote, “She was patient and informative and able to answer all my questions.” Another family wrote, “Greys is a perfect asset to the University and to parents and students.” Jessurum joined Poly in 2002 after eight years in Financial Aid at LaGuardia College, where she is an alumna. Currently on maternity leave, she gave birth September 8 to daughter Aaliyah, named after the late singer and a favorite of her two other children, Larry, 17, and Greys Jr., 12. She and her husband, Andrew, and family live in Queens. Jessurum’s unique first name is a popular name in her native Columbia.

Eunice Ro, director of residence life, won in the category of creativity. “Despite the fact that Eunice began her employment during the last weekend of May 2002, she managed to accommodate Othmer Hall residents beginning June 1, 2002,” wrote a nominator. “Without an experienced staff or a reservation process in place, Eunice, through creativity combined with knowledge and experience, literally launched a residence life program overnight!” Ro worked at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst for five years before coming to Poly. She holds a BA in Political Science and MS in Public Administration from the University at Albany. Born in South Korea, she moved with her family to the United States when she was 7. She currently lives in the Othmer Residence Hall.

Peter Swanson, adjunct instructor in Computer and Information Science, won in the category of pride and enthusiasm. He was nominated by a student, who wrote, “[Swanson] teaches us values for computer science to incorporate in the real world. [He] makes learning a difficult computer language fun and worthwhile…a generous provider of knowledge. Mr. Swanson has a love for teaching. He does it out of his heart.” Swanson is a 1988 Poly grad, with a master’s degree in management. A NYC teacher for 20 years, he was teaching at Murry Bergtraum High School in Manhattan when he retired two years ago. He began teaching at Poly in 1988, first in the YES Center and now in Computer and Information Science. He is married to Jeanne Swanson, former executive assistant to the VP of student affairs and alumni development. They live in East Rockaway and have three children—including Peter, a 1990 Poly graduate—and two grandchildren, with a third due in October.

Stacey Walters, associate dean of admissions, who won in the category of leadership and teamwork. She was recognized for her efforts as interim dean from the time the former dean, Steve Kerge, left in the summer of 2002 to the arrival of the current dean, Jonathan Wexler, in January 2003. “Knowing that meeting the new student enrollment goals were most critical for the University and recognizing that without a strong leader the office might lose its focus, Stacey rose to the occasion,” wrote a nominator, who also praised Walters for being “instrumental in organizing a streamlined reservation process for the Othmer Residence Hall” and for being “most aggressive in enrolling a better academic caliber student” at Polytechnic. Walters joined Poly in 1995 as an administrative assistant in the YES Center before becoming an admissions counselor in 1997. In her current position, she plans such campus events as the Open House and the Spotlight on Scholars dinner and visits high schools as a recruiter.

Extra Step Award winners are nominated by employees and students. The 1-2-3 Rewards & Recognition Team chooses up to six winners each month from among the nominees. Three times a year, the team chooses a winner for an Extra Mile Award from among the Extra Step Award winners. To nominate someone for an award, fill out a nomination form on Poly’s Intranet.

Back to headlines

 

MEET SONIA MOIN, STUDENT COUNCIL’S INTERIM PRESIDENT

As Poly’s interim student council president, Sonia Moin ’04 (who hopes to be officially elected at the September 29 election), has made communications her top priority. “There’s a lack of communication between the student clubs and the council and between administration and the students,” she says. “I want to improve the communication flow and, thereby, strengthen the council’s role in working with both students and administration.”

To achieve that goal, Moin plans to invite to Student Council meetings representatives from different administrative offices, such as Career Services, Facilities Management and Lackmann Culinary Services, so students can learn more about how each office operates and what services they provide. She also has put on her agenda proposals for two Student Town Hall meetings a semester and the creation of an events calendar to publicize student club activities. Although, several clubs have disbanded in the past year, Moin has received just as many applications for new clubs and is pleased to see they are equally distributed among cultural, professional and athletic focuses. “Poly students have a wide range of interests,” she says, “and the variety of the clubs demonstrates that.”

A native of Bangladesh, whose family immigrated to Queens 10 years ago, Moin came to Poly in 2000 as a transfer student from St. John’s. Originally a computer science major, she has since switched to business and technology management and, after graduation, plans to go on for her master's and work in market research. She became involved in extracurricular activities as secretary for the West Indian Student Association and council rep for the Society of Women Engineers student chapter. She was then elected to the Student Council as vice president for clubs and organizations. Explaining why she sought the top job, she says, “Being part of Student Council, I had all these ideas of what we could be doing and I wanted to implement them.”

Moin wants to hear from faculty and staff. Student Council meetings are held every Monday at 1 p.m. in JAB 475. Moin can be reached at ext. 5960 and scpresident@utopia.poly.edu.

Back to headlines

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, ERNST WEBER!

Ernst Weber, Polytechnic’s sixth president and professor for almost six decades, is often linked with such giants as Carl Friedrich Gauss, Samuel Morse, E. W. Siemens, Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison—inventors who helped usher in a technological explosion through the then-undeveloped discipline of electrical engineering. Weber’s contribution was to pioneer the development of microwave communications equipment.

This issue, ePoly Briefs takes a moment to celebrate the memory of Ernst Weber on the 102nd anniversary of his birth.

Weber was born September 6, 1901, in Vienna, Austria, the oldest of five children of a railway employee and his wife. Weber was interested in both the practical and theoretical aspects of science and technology and almost simultaneously earned one doctorate in physics and another in engineering from different universities in Vienna. He began his career as a research engineer for Siemens-Schukert, before moving, in 1930, to the United States to be a visiting professor at Poly. He taught graduate courses and helped broaden Poly’s evening graduate program, one of the nation’s first and largest of its kind at the time.

While at Poly, Weber became interested in microwaves—electromagnetic waves with very short wavelengths and high frequencies. Much of his work during this time became the basis for the creation of a radar system, since radar involves bouncing microwaves off an object to detect its location. In 1945, he was named head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and director of the Microwave Research Institute, which he founded several years earlier as the Microwave Research Group on Long Island. He also founded the Polytechnic Research and Development Company. Although the institute and company were both based at Poly and comprised the same researchers, the institute served as an academic tool for the University and the company as a commercial one, playing a key role during World War II in manufacturing components needed for radar. The company was sold in 1959 and the institute was renamed the Weber Research Institute in 1985 and, most recently, the Weber Wireless Research Institute.

From 1957 to 1969, Weber served as president of Polytechnic. On the day of his inauguration, Poly dedicated its new campus on Jay Street. During his tenure, he oversaw the establishment of the Long Island campus in Farmingdale, the launch of a formal alumni-giving program and the creation of a BS degree in Humanities and Social Sciences. He held more than 30 patents in microwave technology and wrote two widely read books, including The Evolution of Electrical Engineering: A Personal Perspective. He received the Presidential Certificate of Honor from President Truman in 1948 and the National Medal of Science from President Reagan in 1987. He co-founded the prestigious National Academy of Engineering and helped merge the Institute of Radio Engineers with the American Institute of Electrical Engineering to form the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). In 1963, he became IEEE’s first president. In 1970, Polytechnic awarded Weber an honorary doctorate in engineering.

Weber was married for 48 years to Sonya Weber, a physican and author of the K-W (Kraus-Weber) tests for minimal physical fitness. She founded a children's clinic for corrective exercises at the Baby's Hospital of Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. During World War II, she established the first formal clinic for cerebrally injured children. She died in 1984.

Weber retired from Polytechnic in 1969 and spent the next decade working for the National Research Council. He died February 15, 1996, in North Carolina at age 94, survived by two step-daughters, five grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Today, his portrait hangs in Silleck Lounge.

For more about his life, visit the IEEE History Center Web site to read a 1991 interview with Weber.

Back to headlines

 

REGNA LOUNGE IS DEDICATED OCTOBER 7

The Peter P. and Barbara L. Regna Student Lounge will be dedicated at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, October 7. Attending the event will be the sons of the late Regnas, Robert, chief executive of U.S. Laser, and Peter, president and CEO of Aero Tech Laboratories.

The Regna Student Lounge is named after the late Regna ’32 ’37 ’42 H’94 and his wife. In an illustrious career at Pfizer Inc. in the 1940s and ’50s, Regna played key roles in discovering Terramycin, an antibiotic effective against more than 100 diseases, and producing penicillin, streptomycin and other antibiotics. Later, at the Squibb Institute for Medical Research (now Bristol-Myers Squibb), he was among the first to explore the new area of genetic engineering. He also co-founded Harrington Research Company in New Jersey.

Regna was a major benefactor to the University. In 2000, he gave $1.5 million to establish a Laboratory for Biomacromolecular Engineering, the research arm of Poly’s NSF Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing of Macromolecules, directed by Richard A. Gross. Regna died in 2001 at age 94.

Back to headlines

 

UNIVERSITY HOSTS NATIONAL STUDENT CONFERENCE

From October 23 to 25, Polytechnic, in partnership with Brooklyn Tech, is hosting the 2003 National Student Conference of the National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools in Mathematics, Science and Technology (NCSSSMST). The David Packard Center is coordinating the conference for Poly.

The event—with the theme “Realizing the American Dream through Engineering and Technology”—will bring 300 high school students from the nation’s leading magnet schools to attend workshops, enjoy NYC’s cultural and science institutions and gain a first-hand view of how science has influenced the city’s ability to meet the challenges of the recent past. Among the activities planned are workshops on urban security, Internet cryptography, C++ programming language and the technologies used in the entertainment industry; tours of the MTA, the NYC waterfront, the Brooklyn Bridge, New York Stock Exchange and the Metropolitan Opera; and a dinner cruise around New York.

Visit the NCSSSMST Web site to learn more about the event.

Back to headlines

 

OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATIONS NOW COVERED IN POLY’S FLEX SPENDING ACCOUNT

BeneFlex, Polytechnic’s carrier for its Flexible Spending Account, now covers over-the counter medications. Medications eligible for tax reimbursement are defined as those used to alleviate or treat illness and/or injuries, such as antacids, pain relievers and allergy and cold medications. Vitamins, dietary supplements and other such items used for general good health are not covered. If you are currently enrolled in the Flexible Spending Account, you may submit for reimbursement an itemized, descriptive cash register receipt(s) for any over-the-counter purchase made since January 1, 2003. (You must also complete a medical reimbursement claim form, which can be found on Poly’ s Intranet under Online Forms or on Beneflex’s Web site).

Polytechnic’s Flexible Spending Account allows you to deduct a portion of your paycheck, pre-tax, to reimburse medical and dependent care costs. The maximum pre-tax deduction is $2,500 a year for medical costs and $5,000 a year for dependent care costs. You have until December 17 to enroll in or change either or both accounts for 2004. Forms are available in Human Resources or on My Poly in the Polytechnic Community section under HR Bulletins, Open Enrollment 2004 folder. For more information, contact Sally Chan at ext. 4038 or chan@poly.edu.

Back to headlines

 

THE POLY HEALTH CENTER IS HERE FOR YOU

The Poly Health Center in the Othmer Residence Hall is designed to serve the medical needs of staff, faculty and students. Whether you have a sprain or flu or just need some information, the center has board-certified doctors available throughout the week. Most health plans are accepted, including Oxford.

For more information, visit the Poly Health Center Web site.

Back to headlines

 

NEW HIRES AND PROMOTIONS

Welcome to the following new employees:

Daniel O’Connor joined Poly September 15 as director of student accounts, replacing Mary Ann Langbart, who left in June. O'Connor held a similar position for the past 12 years at Stevens Institute of Technology. He holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Georgian Court College in New Jersey and an associates degree in business management. He and his wife, Linda, a child psychologist in the New Jersey school system, have four children, ages 24, 22 and twins, 19. He can be reached at ext. 3333 and doconnor@poly.edu.

Kent Yuen began his new job as assistant dean of admissions in August. His first task is to improve recruitment on Long Island. Yuen comes to Poly from New York University’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies, where he was an admissions counselor. Previously, he was an academic counselor at the University of Phoenix in San Diego and an admissions counselor at his alma mater, Goucher University in Baltimore (he earned a BA in American History). A native New Yorker, he currently lives in Manhattan. He can be reached at ext. 3233 and kyuen@poly.edu.

Congratulations to the following staff and faculty members who were recently promoted:

Carol Campell was promoted to associate director from counselor in Student Accounts. Campbell now oversees TAP certifications and loan disbursements for students as well as retaining her role as information analyst for the office. She replaces Terry Padmore, who left in June. Campbell joined Student Accounts at the Farmingdale campus in 1997 and moved to MetroTech when that campus closed in 2002. A native Long Islander, she lives in Roosevelt with her husband, Michael, and sons, Brian, 9, and Terrell, 3. She’s currently enrolled in Poly’s MS program in Management of Technology. She can be reached at ext. 3649 (a new number) and ccampbel@poly.edu.

Daniel Feygin was promoted to research assistant from administrative aide/bookkeeper in Development. In his new role, he assumes many of the responsibilities held by Mahnaz Karim, former director of development research, who left in July. He oversees the alumni database, identifies; researches and profiles major donor prospects; and produces reports for Development, University Relations and Alumni Relations. Feygin joined Development in 2002. Previously, he worked in Information Systems for three years while he completed his bachelor’s degree in technical and professional communication. He is now enrolled in Poly’s master’s program in management. A native of the Ukraine, Feygin immigrated at age 14 with his family to the Brighton Beach section of Brooklyn, where he still lives. He can be reached at ext. 3543 and dfeygin@poly.edu.

Anthea Jeffrey was promoted to asistant director in Student Accounts from senior administrative secretary in the Graduate Center. Assuming many of the duties formerly held by Carol Campbell, Jeffrey is the liaison between students and the company Tuition Management Systems in handling student tuition refunds and monthly payment plans. She came to Poly in 1991 as an electrical engineering student and left three years later to work full time (from 1994 to 1998, she worked on the 107th floor of the World Trade Center). She came back to Poly in 1998 as an administrative aide in Student Accounts, before moving, in 2000, to the offices of the president and provost, and then, in 2001, to the Graduate Center. She returned to Student Accounts in August. A Poly alumna, she holds a bachelor’s degree in technical and professional communication and a master’s in e-business management. She’s currently enrolled in the MS program in Financial Engineering. Jeffrey was born on the small volcanic island of Montserrat and lived in Trinidad and Antigua, before moving to the United States to attend college. She can be reached at ext. 3728 (a new number) and ajeffrey@poly.edu.

Elisa Linsky is now full time as an instructor and coordinator of the undergraduate Technical Communication Program, replacing Liz Chesla. She also teaches Critical Writing and Introduction to Technical Communication. For the past two years, Linsky was an adjunct instructor in Humanities and Social Sciences and coordinator and instructor for the writing component of EG 1004, the latter responsibilities of which she still retains. A graduate of Wittenberg University in Ohio, with a BA in American Studies, she worked in the financial industry for seven years before leaving to raise her daughters, Eliana, 14, and Natania, 12. She and husband, Seth, and children live in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn. She can be reached at ext. 3938 and elinsky@poly.edu.

Christine Worden has moved from manager of information literacy programs at the Dibner Library to director of special events and projects in University Relations. Replacing Mary Ann Scalia, who retired in August, she is responsible for the annual Promise Fund Dinner, a black-tie gala that raises money for Polytechnic’s largest scholarship and pre-college outreach programs. She will also oversee the coordination and execution of other University events, including the annual President’s Associates reception, the Lynford Lecture Series and presidential dinners and receptions. Worden, who joined the Dibner Library in 2000, assisted in the planning of the 1999 and 2000 Promise Fund dinners and in the development of ME 100, a 1999 celebration of 100 years of mechanical engineering at Poly. Previously, she had a 13-year career as a development and acquisitions editor in book publishing. She is married to Rodney Miller, former Poly executive director of development and current vice president at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. They live on Long Island. Worden starts her new job October 1 and can be reached at ext. 3982 (a new number) and cworden@poly.edu.

Back to headlines

 

AWARDS AND HONORS

David C. Chang, president, received a 2003 Vision in America Award from International Channel Networks as part of its “We the People” celebration, a nationwide community public affairs campaign that recognizes contributions of immigrants to the United States.

Mark M. Green, professor of organic chemistry, received a U.S. patent for “Temperature Measurement and Temperature Controlled Switching Based on Helical Sense Dependent Liquid Crystal Phases.”

Back to headlines

 

PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

MANAGEMENT
Mel Horwitch, panel chair, “Emerging User-Based and Global-Intensive Sources of Innovation on the Wireless Arena,” and program chair, M-Business 2003: The Second International Conference on Mobile Business, Vienna, Austria (June 23-24)
_____ (with Bharat Rao), “Wireless’ New Role as a Vehicle for Strategic Uplift: Samsung’s Global Innovation Strategy as a Case in Point,” M-Business 2003: The Second International Conference on Mobile Business, Vienna, Austria (June 23-24)
_____ general chair, M-Business 2004: The Third International Conference on Mobile Business, New York City (July 12-13, 2004)

Bharat P. Rao, panel chair and moderator, “Wireless Innovation Diffusion: What Does the Future Hold?” and track chair, “Researching into the Future of M-Business,” M-Business 2003: The Second International Conference on Mobile Business, Vienna, Austria (June 23-24)
_____ (with Mihir Parikh), “Wireless Broadband Drivers and Their Social Implications,” accepted for publication in Technology in Society (date to come)
____ (with Mihir Parikh), “Wireless Broadband Networks: The U.S. Experience,” accepted for publication in International Journal of Electronic Commerce (date to come)

Nina D. Ziv, “New Media as Catalysts for Change in the Transformation of the Book Publishing Industry,” published in The International Journal of Media Management (Vol. 4, No. 2, 2002)
_____ “Digital and Wireless Innovation at the Walt Disney Company,” case study and teaching note, published by European Case Clearing House (2003)
_____ “New Perspectives on Wireless Innovation in the Media Industry: The Walt Disney Company and Bertelsmann as Cases in Point,” presented at M-Business 2003: The Second International Conference on Mobile Business, Vienna, Austria (June 23-24)

Back to headlines

 

THIS MONTH IN HISTORY

So...
be your name Buxbaum or Bixby or Bray
or Mordecai Ali Van Allen O'Shea,
you're off to Great Places!
Today is your day!
Your mountain is waiting.
So...get on your way!

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as children’s author Dr. Seuss, who died of cancer in La Jolla, Calif., on September 24, at age 87 (1991)

Spaniard Ignatius Loyola founds Society of Jesus, a.k.a. Jesuits (1540) . . . “I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country,” declares American Revolutionary spy Nathan Hale before being hanged at age 21 by British from apple-tree near present-day Manhattan intersection of 66th Street and Third Avenue (1776) . . . California becomes 31st state, and territories of New Mexico and Utah are created (1850) . . . The New York Times starts publishing at 2 cents a copy (1851) . . . Phillip W. Pratt of Abington, Mass., patents sprinkler system for extinguishing fires (1872) . . . President William McKinley shot by anarchist Leon Czolgosz at Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y. (1901) . . . Mickey Mouse debuts in short cartoon “Steamboat Willie” at Colony Theater in NYC (1928) . . . NYC native Elizabeth Seton canonized as first U.S.-born saint (1975) . . . Humanitarian Mother Teresa dies of heart attack in Calcutta, India, at age 87 (1997) . . . 3,021 poeple die in worst terrorist attack on U.S. soil (2001).

Back to headlines


ePoly Briefs is published the last week of each month by the
Office of Communications and Media Relations
Editor: Therese E. Tillett, 718/260-3165, JB 551A
Polytechnic University, September 2003

HAPPENINGS

 

SEPTEMBER

Monday 29

Last day to enroll in or change healthcare benefits

 

8:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.

TIAA-CREF Individual Counseling Sessions

LC 433

 

11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Symbol Technologies Distinguished Lecture Series “New Paradigms in Control Theory Stemming from Emerging Technologies”

Romeo Ortega, director of research, Supelec (France)

LC 400

 

5 p.m.

Poly vs. Brooklyn College

Men's soccer

Floyd Bennett Field

 

Tuesday 30

3-5 p.m.

Extra Step/Extra Mile Awards Ceremony

LC 400

 

OCTOBER

Wednesday 1

4 p.m.

Poly vs. Mt. St. Vincent

Men's soccer

Floyd Bennett Field

 

4-5 p.m.

Math Colloquim

"The Generalized Riemann Integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus"

Washek F. Pfeffer, professor emeritus, UC Davis

 

Thursday 2

4 p.m.

Poly vs. Mt. St. Vincent

Women's tennis

National Tennis Center, Queens

 

Friday 3

3:30 p.m.

Poly vs. City College

Women's tennis

National Tennis Center, Queens

 

4 p.m.

Poly vs. City Tech

Men's soccer

City Tech

 

7 p.m.

Poly vs. City Tech

Women's volleyball

City Tech

 

7 p.m.-12 a.m.

Webster Hall DJ Tour 2003

Regna Lounge

 

Sunday 5

3 p.m.

Poly vs. Pratt

Men's soccer

Floyd Bennett Field

 

Monday 6

School closed

Yom Kippur

 

Tuesday 7

Monday classes meet

No Tuesday classes

 

1 p.m.

Dedication of Regna Student Lounge

 

Wednesday 8

8:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.

TIAA-CREF Individual Counseling Sessions

LC 433

 

11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Career Fair

Gymnasium

 

5-7 p.m.

Principal's Scholars Dinner and Symposium

"Blockerless Thrust Reversing Concept"

Iraj M. Kalkohoran, Polytechnic

Faculty Dining Room

 

Saturday 11

1 p.m.

Poly vs. Sarah Lawrence

Women's tennis

National Tennis Center, Queens

 

Sunday 12

3 p.m.

Poly vs. Medgar Evers

Men's soccer

Floyd Bennett Field

 

Monday 13

No classes

Columbus Day

  

Thursday 16

11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Symbol Technologies Distinguished Lecture Series

Tolga M. Duman, assistant professor, Arizona State University

Dibner Auditorium

  

Friday 17

10:45 a.m.

CBSE Fall Colloquium

"STM Investigation of the Self-Assembly of Chiral and Achiral Molecules at Liquid-Solid and Solid-Vacuum Interfaces: Driving Forces for 2-D Separation of Chiral Species"

George Flynn, Higgins Professor of Chemistry, Columbia

JAB 775

 

4 p.m.

Poly vs. SUNY Maritime

Men's soccer

Floyd Bennett Field

 

Saturday 18

8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Urban Security Certificate Course

LC 102

 

12 p.m.

Poly vs. New Rochelle

Women's tennis

National Tennis Center, Queens

 

Sunday 19

8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Urban Security Certificate Course

LC 102

 

12 p.m.

Poly vs. Pratt

Women's tennis

National Tennis Center, Queens

 

2 p.m.

Poly vs. Baruch

Men's soccer

Floyd Bennett Field

 

Monday 20

4 p.m.

Sixth Annual Lynford Lecture

“Computational and Experimental Approaches for Annotating the Drosophila Genome Sequence."

Gerald M. Rubin, VP for biomedical research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Dibner Auditorium

 

Wednesday 22

3:30 p.m.

Poly vs. Yeshiva

Women's tennis

National Tennis Center, Queens

 

Thursday 23

11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Symbol Technologies Distinguished Lecture Series

"Network Coding Bsed on Subtree Cecomposition"

Emina Soljanin, Bell Labs

Silleck Lounge

 

Friday 24

7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

NCSSSMST 2003 Student Conference

MetroTech Center

 

10:45 a.m.

CBSE Fall Colloquium

"Optical Alchemy and the Photonic Atom Biosensor"

Stephen Arnold, Thomas Potts Professor of Physics, Polytechnic

JAB 775

 

8 p.m.

Poly vs. Brooklyn College

Women's volleyball

Gymnasium

 

Saturday 25

7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

NCSSSMST 2003 Student Conference

MetroTech Center

 

9 a.m.

Hudson Valley Women's Athetics Championship

Women's tennis

 

Sunday 26

Daylight Savings Time Ends

Clocks move back 1 hour

 

12 p.m.

Fall Open House

MetroTech campus

 

Friday 31

Halloween

 

Last day to file for degree if completed during fall semester

 

10:45 a.m.

CBSE Fall Colloquium /

Morawetz Lecture

"Block Copolymers: Designer Soft Materials"

Frank Bates, professor of chemical engineeirng, University of Minnesota

JAB 775

 

3 p.m.

Hudson Valley Men's Athetics Championship

Men's soccer